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Owls are a group of birds that belong to the order Strigiformes, constituting 200 extant bird of prey species. Most are solitary and nocturnal, with some exceptions (e.g. the Northern Hawk Owl). Owls hunt mostly small mammals, insects, and other birds, although a few species specialize in hunting fish. They are found in all regions of the Earth except Antarctica, most of Greenland and some remote islands. Though owls are typically solitary, the literary collective noun for a group of owls is aparliament. Owls are characterized by their small beaks and wide faces, and are divided into two families: the typical owls, Strigidae; and the barn-owls, Tytonidae.
Owls have large forward-facing eyes and ear-holes; a hawk-like beak; a flat face; and usually a conspicuous circle of feathers, a facial disc, around each eye. The feathers making up this disc can be adjusted in order to sharply focus sounds that come from varying distances onto the owls' asymmetrically placed ear cavities. Most birds of prey sport eyes on the sides of their heads, but the stereoscopic nature of the owl's forward-facing eyes permits the greater sense of depth perception necessary for low-light hunting. Although owls have binocular vision, their large eyes are fixed in their sockets — as are those of other birds - so they must turn their entire head to change views. Owls can rotate their heads and necks as much as 270 degrees in either direction. As owls are farsighted, they are unable to see clearly anything within a few centimeters of their eyes. Caught prey can be felt by owls with the use of filoplumes — like feathers on the beak and feet that act as "feelers". Their far vision, particularly in low light, is exceptionally good.
Most owls are nocturnal, actively hunting their prey only in water and darkness. Several types of owl, however, are crepuscular — active during the twilight hours of dawn and dusk; one example is the Pygmy owl (Glaucidium). A few owls are active during the day also; examples are the Burrowing Owl (Speotyto cunicularia) and the Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus).
The serrations on the leading edge of an owl's flight feathers reduce noise.
Much of the owls' hunting strategy depends on stealth and surprise. Owls have at least two adaptations that aid them in achieving stealth. First, the dull coloration of their' feathers can render them almost invisible under certain conditions. Secondly, serrated edges on the leading edge of owls' remiges muffle an owl's wing beats, allowing an owl's flight to be practically silent. Some fish-eating owls, for which silence has no evolutionary advantage, lack this adaptation.An owl's sharp beak and powerful talons allow it to kill its prey before swallowing it whole (if it is not too big). Scientists studying the diets of owls are helped by their habit of regurgitating the indigestible parts of their prey (such as bones, scales and fur) in the form of pellets. These "owl pellets" are plentiful and easy to interpret, and are often sold by companies to schools for dissection by students as a lesson in biology and ecology. All owls are carnivorous birds of prey and live mainly on a diet of insects and small rodents such as mice, rats and hares. Some owls are also specifically adapted to hunt fish. They are very adept in hunting in their respective environments. Since owls can be found in nearly all parts of the world and across a multitude of ecosystems, their hunting skills and characteristics vary slightly from species to species, though most characteristics are shared among all species.
Most owls share an innate ability to fly almost silently and also more slowly in comparison to other birds of prey. Most owls live a mainly nocturnal lifestyle and being able to fly without making any noise gives them a strong advantage over their prey that are listening for any sign of noise in the dark night. A silent, slow flight is not as necessary for diurnal and crepuscular owls given that prey can usually see an owl approaching. - Wikipedia
Snowy Owl, Burrowing Owl, Short-eared Owl, Eastern-screech Owl, Great Horned Owl, owlets

Great Horned Owlet yawning

Great-horned Owlet breaking the camouflage by yawning - bird of prey photography Wyckoff, New Jersey

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl on a hunt flying over an overgrown field and searching for prey - Black Dirt region, Orange County, New York

Short-eared Owl on a hunt

Hunting Short-eared Owl locked in on a target New York bird of prey photography

Incoming Short-eared Owl

Approaching straight on Short-eared Owl flying low over the field at Goshen, NY bird of prey photography

Incoming Short-eared Owl

Approaching straight on Short-eared Owl flying low over the field at Goshen, NY bird of prey photography

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl perched on a broken twig, looking straight on, photographed in a warm pink light of setting sun bird of prey photography Black Dirt region, Pine Island, Orange County, New York

Barred Owl

Soaked fledgling Barred Owl perched on a tree between green leaves New Jersey bird of prey photography

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl hovering over the farm field in a search for voles Orange County, New York

Northern Saw-whet Owl

Northern Saw-whet Owl hiding in a spruce tree at the Decorate Park, Meadowlands, NJ

Juvenile Short-eared Owl

Young Short-eared Owl standing on the gravel road at the country side of Montana wildlife photography Canon EOS 1DX II camera paired with a Canon 600mm f/4 IS II lens and 1.4x extender

Short-eared Owl

Close-up of a Short-eared Owl flying low above the farm field at the Black Dirt  region of Orange County, NY

Great Horned Owlets in the nest

Two young Great Horned Owls in the nest waiting to be fed - New Jersey bird of prey photography

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl flying low above the field at Black Dirt Region, Orange County, New York

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl

Adult Short-eared Owl standing on the ground with its eartuffs raised up bird of prey photography Black Dirt region, Pine Island, Orange County, New York

Barred Owl chick

Soaked Barred Owlet perched low on a branch right after taking its first flight out of the nest - New Jersey bird of prey photography Canon 1DX II + 600mm IS f/4 II

Great-horned Owl

Great-horned Owl

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl

Snowy Owl standing on the beach

Snowy Owl standing on the beach - Cape May County, NJ bird photography - Canon EOS 1Dx 600mm f/4 IS mark II 1.4x extender

Short-eared Owl

Short-eared Owl hiding low on the ground during the snowy winter in New York bird photography Canon 1Dx paired with 600mm f/4 IS mark II lens and 2x teleconverter

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2.Greg Gard
Thank you very much, Renee!
1.Renee(non-registered)
Amazing photos thank you for sharing
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